Estate Planning

What is Estate Planning?

Estate planning is the preparation of a plan for the management and disposal of your estate during the your life and after death, while minimizing gift, estate, generation skipping transfer, and income taxes.


 Does that include you? Yes believe it or not, you have an estate, nearly everyone does. Your estate is comprised of everything you own— your car, home, other real estate, checking and savings accounts, investments, life insurance, furniture, personal possessions.  


The question is, if something happens to you, whose hand would your estate fall into?  It is our job to guide you though the process of anticipating and arranging, for the management and disposal of your estate during your life time, and at the time of your death, and after death.


Estate Assets

Solely owned assets

Jointly owned assets

Assets held in a trust

Business interests

Life insurance proceeds

Retirement accounts

Open contracts


Personal Representitives

Mr. DeWitt will help you prepare the necessary documents to open an estate and request your preferred appointment as the personal representative.  If you have not nominated someone, a personal representative is someone appointed by the court to control or manage your property that belongs only to you after your death.   

The personal representative is responsible for carrying out the duties and responsibilities stated in the law.  

Do you need an attorney's help with your estate plan?

An experienced attorney in estate planning, probate and administration, such as Mr. DeWitt, who will make the entire process efficient and cost -effective, even when no formal proceedings are required.  

His experience will help you avoid mistakes and ensure your assets are protected and distributed to your loved ones as you desire.

Facts of the matter

Estate planning is often a neglected part of financial planning. It's easy to avoid and delay answering  the uncomfortable questions such as “What happens to my assets and my loved  ones when I die?” It's no surprise that roughly half of Americans  don't have a will or a trust, and even fewer have an estate plan.